December 2018 Print

Chapter Update

Happy Holidays!

Happy Holidays everyone!  As this year comes to a close, it was another successful one for PMIGLC.  We had over 1000 attendees combined at our symposium, PD Day, dinner meetings, and happy hour events.  We also saw our chapter grow to almost 1,900 members and our generous sponsors provided support.  Next year, we are poised for even more events as well as more volunteer, networking, and career development opportunities.  

It has been a pleasure serving PMIGLC as President over the past year.  I look forward to continuing to be involved with the chapter and seeing you at our upcoming dinner meetings and Spring Symposium.

On behalf of myself and the PMIGLC Board of Directors, we wish you a safe and happy holiday season to you and your families and a prosperous new year.
Sincerely,
Ron Papa

 

Back to top

Monthly Meeting & Networking Forum

January Monthly Meeting

Most leaders don’t know how to deal with the pressure that comes from the pursuit of success.  This impacts their mind, body, relationships, and works negatively.

During the Leader’s Journey keynote, your leaders will gather the tools they need to perform at their highest level no matter the circumstance.  It will help them gain mental clarity, increase productivity, communicate powerfully, and build better and deeper relationships.

The Leader’s Journey is the story of how I went from being in bed with a back injury to cycleing 14,000 miles from Alaska to Argentina...and the main lessons I learned along the way.

Learning Objectives

  • Express your feelings in a healthy way.
  • Replace negative thoughts with constructive ones.
  • Use empowering language with yourself and others.
  • Train your body to release stress and gain energy.
  • Shift behaviors to positively impact your lifeganization.

Speaker: Ricardo Palomares is an international keynote speaker, coach, author, filmmaker, and explorer. He immigrated to the United States from Mexicano City after graduating from photography school with the singular focus of building a career that would allow him to explore the world.  His most recent project, Pedal South, entailed leading a team on a two-year expedition - cycling from Alaska to Argentina.

Back to top

Professional Development Opportunities

Watch for Upcoming Professional Development Opportunities!

Check the website for upcoming events.

Back to top

Communications

Moylan’s Mulligans 

Volunteering with Habitat for Humanity: Making a World of Difference


How was your Thanksgiving holiday? This year, I enjoyed a truly remarkable experience. For two weeks, I was in Guatemala. Most of the time, I was volunteering with the Habitat for Humanity Global Village in San Lucas Toliman. This Habitat volunteer experience was my first international build in the 25 years I have been associated with Habitat for Humanity. Concurrent with my Habitat volunteering activity, I took advantage of my time in Guatemala to meet with the local PMI Chapter.

This article will share my experiences and reflections on being part of the Habitat project and my interactions with the PMI Guatemala Chapter. [Pictures of my construction work, the Thanksgiving celebration and PMI Guatemala Chapter class are included in the photo gallery here.

The Habitat Global Village construction project assisted nine families over four days on Monday 19 through Thursday 22 November 2018. My new friends include 25 fellow volunteers from around the United States and three staff members (Juan, Diego, Freddy) of the local Habitat for Humanity-Guatemala office. We helped make up the construction crews that built eight smokeless cook stoves, four latrines and the foundation for a new home.

Making do with what one has at hand is imperative when working in the Third World. Sizing an adobe masonry block using a machete was a new experience for me. On the new house site, a shovel handle broke. Instead of going to a local hardware store to purchase a new one, a Guatemalan construction hand carved a new one from a papaya branch in less than 15-minutes. The local Guatemalan’s skill with the machete is remarkable; I never thought about how versatile a tool the machete can be.

An imperative on all Habitat construction projects is leveraging the volunteer and local talent. On this Global Village project, 2/3 of the volunteers were female. All were very good workers with the right “can-do” attitude. It was a pleasure to work with all of them. Amazing how much unskilled and semi-skilled construction workers with the right attitude can accomplish.

Much to my delight, I got to do grunt construction work. At the end of each work day, I was quite dirty, rather tired and felt very good about what was accomplished. Throughout the project, I refrained from re-engineering the stove and latrine designs. Although, I did expedite some of the construction methods. Local materials and local skilled workers were used throughout the construction. The local tradesmen were very talented; I was impressed with their masonry, carpentry and concrete skills. When faced with unexpected challenges, they were able to improvise effectively and efficiently. The volunteers and local workers alike were never discouraged, always smiling as they went on with their work tasks finding novel ways to make it happen.

The Guatemalan countryside is remarkably lush and beautiful. One of the many volcanoes did spew a bit of ash but no lava eruption. The smiles and genuine happiness of the Guatemalan families I encountered were incredible. At each build site, the children were ready helpers. Their parents and grandparents were all on hand assisting as they were able. What a joy to help them improve their environmental systems and homes.

An amazing fact – 50% of the domiciles in the world have a dirt floor. Simple, low cost improvements like providing a cook stove with the smoke vented to the outside, clean drinking water and a sanitary toilet facility, yield tremendous results in enhancing the quality of the lives of these Mayan people.

At the closing celebration held on Thanksgiving evening, the families and volunteers feasted at the Restuarante La Cabañia in San Lucas Toliman. The festivities started with two piñatas smashed by the children. Instead of the typical American Thanksgiving fare of turkey, dressing, potatoes prepared four different ways, other multiple side dishes, pumpkin pie, and more turkey, followed by a nap, the families and Habitat volunteers shared together a traditional Guatemalan feast. For dinner, we dined on a local appetizer, tamales, chicken stew, refried beans and rice, followed by sweet bread with honey and Guatemalan coffee for dessert. Each of the families received a clean water kit, which were funded in part by Rotary International. It will be a Feliz Navidad for the families.

At the front end of my journey, on 14 November, I attended the monthly ‘after work’ meeting of the PMI Guatemala Chapter in Guatemala City. The Chapter meets at the local Chili’s Restaurant. (Yes, the Tex-Mex fare is the same.) Although my Spanish is quite basic, I was able to follow along on the series of short PM skills presentations. They say that project management is the universal language; true enough.

On 26 November, on my way out, I presented a half-day seminar on “Preparing & Presenting Effective Project Proposals” in English for 35 PMI Guatemala Chapter members. This is the second PM training course I have presented to the PMI Guatemala Chapter; the previous one was on 18 July 2018. The presentation was my beta-test of a course under development. The course take-away was a compendium of the Moylan’s Mulligans articles written by Lisa Roach and myself over the last two years. Stay tuned.

Overall, a very interesting and exciting two week sojourn in project management learning.

By Bill Moylan, PhD, PMP, FESD, DTM
PMIGLC Vice President – Outreach, 2017-2018

Back to top

PMIĀ® News

Checkout the Webinars Offered on ProjectManagement.com
Register for live and play on-demand webinars on projectmanagement.com.

Back to top

Welcome New Members

Welcome New Chapter Members Who Joined in November

Johannes Abona
Trisha Allsop
Randy Boyer
Douglas Czinder
John Dressler
Graham Duplantis
Harish Gadepalli
Carla Giacopelli
catherine healey
Noam Kimelman
Melanie Kittridge


Cindy Lang
Kara Lewis
David Logan
Sharon Martin
Ronald Mills, Sr.
Marilyn Nash
Colin Sandbach
Zac Stoll
Laura Strathdee
David Valentine
Matthew Walker
Manavdeep Warraich
Dorian Wilson
Frank Zsirai

Back to top